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SSBC Over Budget

North Reading High School/Middle School Construction project.

The SSBC has announced the schools project is $9 to 12 million dollars short. Apparently the plan is to have another special town meeting and election this Spring to request additional funds. The $107 million project would swell to as much as $119 million.

No word on the new projected tax increase. Sadly its an all too familiar scenario when special interest groups elect their members to the Selectman & School Committee. This has been a poorly planned project from the start. But the Selectman refuse to acknowledge that fact, again due to the special interest pressure. Hopefully the Selectman will have the courage to advise the SSBC that they will have to stay within the monies allocated. That is what they promised the electorate when they unanimously approved this endeavor. Stay to your word.

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Ed Canney January 16, 2013 at 05:53 PM
Mel I appreciate your explanation. However as I pointed out, the building code requires architectural plans be reviewed by a structural engineer for projects of this magnitude. Additionally soil analysis is required. Its all in the "Construction Control" section of the State Code, for all construction 35,000 cu/ft and over. Prior to permit issuance, building departments require affidavits from electrical, mechanical and structural engineers that they have reviewed the plans and will inspect within their discipline as the project progresses and submit reports relative to those inspections. I just can't imagine the MSBA advising communities to subvert the codes. If there are members of the SSBC with "construction experience", then they missed some very important criteria. Wasn't several million spent on "plan preparation"? Well, that's when these issues should have been resolved.
Ed Canney January 16, 2013 at 06:47 PM
Mel I appreciate your explanation. However as I pointed out, the building code requires architectural plans be reviewed by a structural engineer for projects of this magnitude. Additionally soil analysis is required. Its all in the "Construction Control" section of the State Code, for all construction 35,000 cu/ft and over. Prior to permit issuance, building departments require affidavits from electrical, mechanical and structural engineers affirming that they have reviewed the plans and will inspect within their discipline as the project progresses and submit reports relative to those inspections. I just can't imagine the MSBA advising communities to subvert the codes. If there are members of the SSBC with "construction experience", then they missed some very important criteria. Wasn't several million spent on "plan preparation"? Well, that's when these issues should have been resolved. As a public official, your responses are sincerely appreciated. Hopefully, you will take some of my advice back to your board & the SSBC.
Ron Powell January 16, 2013 at 07:45 PM
Not indicated anywhere in the article, but this pertains to North Reading and not reading.
Danny M January 23, 2013 at 12:26 PM
Ed, you are correct if we could afford to pay for the whole school . The partnership with the State requires the process we are currently following for the Town to recieve reimbursement
Ed Canney January 23, 2013 at 01:28 PM
I don't doubt that Dan. When I previously commented that the SSBC should consider an 'errors of omission" filing against the architect, I was not being facetious. He/she was responsible to have had a structural engineering review of his/her plans, prior to providing an estimate of the construction. The example being the Middle School roof. An engineering review would have calculated the dead & snow loads required for that roof, and subsequent cost. Same with soil analysis.So if the architect did not perform "due diligence", then they are responsible for cost inaccuracies, and should bear those costs differentials. I've been an expert witness in these types of cases. If the architect blew it, he owns it. Jerry Venezia & Delaney are lawyers. They know that.

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